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Fighting For...

Bringing to light an epic digital migration

 

Our final unit in this class covered video production.  We focused in particular on short, documentary style videos that tell stories.  Here at Notre Dame, there's little we love more than Notre Dame, so the clear example of such documentary style videos we turned to was the What Would You Fight For? series.  Each episode chronicles the work of an ND faculty member and their team, showing the world (or at least those tuned in to ND home football games) how Notre Dame serves the global community.

 

Our task was to produce a similar clip.  The first part of this process was finding a story.  This task ended up being something of an exercise in journalism; looking up staff and faculty projects, contacting project managers, and following leads.  After about two weeks, I found my primary interviewee (the hero of my story), Aaron Wilkey.  Wilkey works with the OIT's Information Security (InfoSec) group and devotes much of his time to Notre Dame's Cloud First initiative, securing our information as it migrates to the cloud.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

This project was perhaps the most technically challenging, as it involved the gathering and synthesis of the most media.  Furthermore, Premiere was probably the most complex piece of software we used in the entirety of the course.  I really enjoyed taking on this challenge.  Using the techniques we'd learned in class (and from reading Steve Stockman's How to Shoot Video that Doesn't Suck), I took my project from the storyboard all the way to YouTube.

 

Non-destructive editing in Premiere

 

As with the image project, non-destructive editing was the order of the day.  The above screenshot only begins to capture how intricuit this, or any video project truly is.  I made liberal use of bins to keep assets organized, and had specific roles for each video and audio track.  Something I'd like to point about the screenshot is that it shows my use of a multi-cam sequence.  This technique ended up being critical to my final product; the camera with which I shot (Sony Handycam) uses a format that dosn't play nicely with Premiere.  In order to have any sound, I had to use a feature of the VLC Player to essentially re-export the audio.  The pink and green panel on the left side of the screen was the only track of the multi-cam sequence with audio, and I had to sync these tracks by hand, manually specifying the aligning frames.

 

In the end, I had a lot of fun with this project and am excited about the video production skills I learned.  I plan on maintaining these skills and applying them whenever I make videos in the future.

 

 

 

Banner photo credit: Darron Birgenheier ("The Unblinking Eye")

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.